PhD theses

All Wageningen University PhD theses

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    Wageningen PhD theses


    This database contains bibliographic descriptions of all Wageningen University PhD theses from 1920 onwards. It is updated on a daily basis by WUR Library.

    Author abstracts and/or summaries are added to all descriptions. A link to the full text dissertation is added to the bibliographic description. In a few cases, no electronic version is available, mostly because of copyright issues.

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    mail icon WUR Library, 9 july 2012

     

Record number 2212289
Title ‘Force of Nature’ : climate shocks, food crises and conflict in Colonial Africa and Asia, 1880-1960
show extra info.
Kostadis J. Papaioannou
Author(s) Papaioannou, Kostadis J. (dissertant)
Publisher Wageningen : Wageningen University
Publication year 2017
Description 238 pages figures, diagrams
Description 1 online resource (PDF, 238 pages) figures, diagrams
Notes Includes bibliographical references. - With summary in English
ISBN 9789463431668; 9463431667
Tutors Frankema, Prof. dr. E.H.P. ; Bulte, Prof. dr. E.H.
Graduation date 2017-06-02
Dissertation no. 6667
Author abstract show abstract

“Global climate change poses one of the most urgent challenges of our age. The increasing frequency and intensity of weather shocks, such as heat waves, droughts, floods, and hurricanes, are all anticipated to adversely affect conditions of agricultural production, and jeopardize efforts to achieve global food security. In recent years, there has been a rapidly growing body of literature across multiple disciplines aiming to quantify and assess the adverse consequences of climate on relatively poor rural societies. Building entirely on original primary sources, this dissertation provides evidence that weather shocks raised property crime, triggered civil conflict and shaped patterns of human settlement in British colonial Africa and Asia during the first half of the twentieth century (~1880-1960). By merging the theoretical and empirical insights of several strands of literature (e.g. economics, history, geography), this dissertation has both academic and social merit. Its academic merit lies in its promise to disentangle the net effect of climate on societies from the many other contextual factors that may affect them. And its social merit lies in its capacity to reveal key factors that can mitigate the adverse consequences of weather shocks, enabling tailor-made policy interventions. In sum, the present dissertation contributes to a better understanding of long-term agrarian development in tropical Africa and Asia, offering fresh input to academic debates on how to mitigate the effects of weather extremes”

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Keyword(s) climatic change / environmental degradation / environmental impact / agricultural development / agriculture / agriculture and environment / historical ecology / history / colonialism / colonization / africa / asia / nigeria / rainfed agriculture / rain
Categories Landscape and Environmental History of Africa
Publication type PhD thesis
Language English
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