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  • The Journal Browser provides a list of more than 30,000 journals. It can be consulted by authors who wish to select a journal for publishing their manuscript Open Access. The information in this list is aggregated from several sources on a regular basis:

    • A list of journals for which the Association of Universities in the Netherlands (VSNU) has made deals with publishers, to make articles Open Access. Under these deals, corresponding authors of Dutch universities can publish their articles Open Access in the participating journals with discounts on the article processing charges (APCs).
    • A list of journals covered by the Journal Citation Reports.
    • A list of journals covered by Scopus.
    • Journals indexed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ).
    • Lists of journals for which specific Dutch universities have made deals with publishers, to make articles Open Access. Under these deals, corresponding authors of these universities can publish their articles Open Access in the participating journals with discounts on the article processing charges (APCs). Depending on the university from which the Journal Browser is consulted, this information is shown.
    • Additional data on citations made to journals, in articles published by staff from a specific Dutch university, that are made available by that university. Depending on the university from which the Journal Browser is consulted, this information is shown.

    In the Journal Browser, a search box can be used to look up journals on certain subjects. The terms entered in this box are used to search the journal titles and other metadata (e.g. keywords).

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    When one selects a journal in the Journal Browser, the following information may be presented:

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    • APC discount that holds for the selected journal if it is part of an Open Access deal.
    • Impact measures for the selected journal from Journal Citation Reports or Scopus. The impact measures that are shown may vary, depending on the university from which the Journal Browser is consulted. For some universities, the number of citations made to the selected journal (in articles published by staff from that university) is also shown.
    • Information from Sherpa/Romeo on the conditions under which articles from the selected journal may be made available via Green Open Access.
    • A listing of articles recently published in the selected journal.
    • For some universities, information is available on what journals have been co-cited most frequently together with the selected journal (in articles published by staff from these universities). When available, this information is presented under ‘similar journals’.
    About

Science

American Association for the Advancement of Science

1880-

ISSN: 0036-8075 (1095-9203)
Multidisciplinary Sciences - Multidisciplinary - Multidisciplinary
APC costs unknown

Recent articles

1 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:11-08:00
Bastin et al. (Reports, 5 July 2019, p. 76) claim that 205 gigatonnes of carbon can be globally sequestered by restoring 0.9 billion hectares of forest and woodland canopy cover. Reinterpreting the data from Bastin et al., we show that the global land area actually required to sequester human-emitted CO2 is at least a factor of 3 higher, representing an unrealistically large area.
2 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:11-08:00
Our study quantified the global tree restoration potential and its associated carbon storage potential under existing climate conditions. Skidmore et al. dispute our findings, using as reference a yearly estimation of carbon storage that could be reached by 2050. We provide a detailed answer highlighting misunderstandings in their interpretation, notably that we did not consider any time limit for the restoration process.
3 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Schmidt C.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1053?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1053 1053
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
4 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00

Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1054?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1054 1055
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
5 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Servick K.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1056?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1056 1056
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
6 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Mervis J.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1057?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1057 1057
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
7 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Stokstad E.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1058?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1058 1058
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
8 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Couzin-Frankel J.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1059?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1059 1060
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
9 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Normile D.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1060?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1060 1060
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
10 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Clery D.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1061?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1061 1061
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
11 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: de Vrieze J.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1062?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1062 1065
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
12 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Falco, G ; Eling ; M ; Jablanski ; D ; Weber ; M ; Miller ; V ; Gordon ; L. A ; Wang ; S. S ; Schmit ; J ; Thomas ; R ; Elvedi ; M ; Maillart ; T ; Donavan ; E ; Dejung ; S ; Durand ; E ; Nutter ; F ; Scheffer ; U ; Arazi ; G ; Ohana ; G ; Lin ; H.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1066?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1066 1069
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
13 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: von Kugelgen, S ; Freedman ; D. E.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1070?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1070 1071
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
14 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Ikemoto S.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1071?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1071 1072
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
15 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Funnell B. E.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1072?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1072 1073
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
16 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Pulendran B.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1074?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1074 1075
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
17 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Jousset P.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1076?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1076 1077
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
18 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Zitvogel, L ; Kroemer ; G.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1077?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1077 1078
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
19 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Soto A. P.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1078?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1078 1079
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
20 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Barnett L.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1080?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1080 1080
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
21 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Swift J.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1081-a?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1081 1081
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
22 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00

Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1081-b?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1081 1081
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
23 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Romero-Munoz, A ; Jansen ; M ; Nunez ; A. M ; Toledo ; M ; Almonacid ; R. V ; Kuemmerle ; T.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1082-a?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1082 1082
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
24 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Wilder-Smith, A ; Hombach ; J ; Cravioto ; A.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1082-b?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1082 1083
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
25 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Hik, D. S ; Williamson ; S. N.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1083?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1083 1083
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
26 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Ham B.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1084?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1084 1085
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
27 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00

Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1085?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1085 1085
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
28 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00

Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1086?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1086 1089
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
29 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Mao S.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1090-a?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1090 1090
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
30 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Stajic J.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1090-b?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1090 1090
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
31 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Grocholski B.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1090-c?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1090 1090
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
32 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Lavine M. S.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1090-d?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1090 1091
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
33 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Zahn L. M.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1090-e?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1090 1091
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
34 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Kelly P. N.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1090-f?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1090 1091
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
35 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Pujanandez L.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1090-g?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1090 1091
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
36 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Fortune S. M.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1090-h?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1090 1091
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
37 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Stern P.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1090-i?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp i 1092
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
38 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Grocholski B.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1090-j?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1090 1092
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
39 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Osborne I. S.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1090-k?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1090 1092
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
40 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Yeston J.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1090-l?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1090 1092
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
41 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Stern P.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1090-m?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1090 1092
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
42 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Stajic J.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1090-n?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1090 1092
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
43 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Mao S.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1090-o?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1090 1092
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
44 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Vinson V.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1090-p?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1090 1092
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
45 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Alderton G.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1090-q?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1090 1092
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
46 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Williams I.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1090-r?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1090 1092
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
47 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Williams E.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1090-s?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1090 1092
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
48 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Funk M. A.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1091-a?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1091 1091
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
49 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Kiberstis P. A.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1091-b?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1091 1092
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
50 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Ash C.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1091-c?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1091 1092
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
51 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Hurtley S. M.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1091-d?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1091 1092
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
52 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Stern P.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1091-e?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1091 1092
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
53 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Smith H. J.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1091-f?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1091 1092
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
54 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Yeston J.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1091-g?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1091 1092
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
55 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
The creation of nanostructures with precise chemistries on material surfaces is of importance in a wide variety of areas such as lithography, superhydrophobicity, and cell adhesion. We describe a platform for surface functionalization that involves the fabrication of cylindrical micellar brushes on a silicon wafer through seeded growth of crystallizable block copolymers at the termini of immobilized, surface-confined crystallite seeds. The density, length, and coronal chemistry of the micellar brushes can be precisely tuned, and post-growth decoration with nanoparticles enables applications in catalysis and antibacterial surface modification. The micellar brushes can also be grown on ultrathin two-dimensional materials such as graphene oxide nanosheets and further assembled into a membrane for the separation of oil-in-water emulsions and gold nanoparticles.
56 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
In normal metals, macroscopic properties are understood using the concept of quasiparticles. In the cuprate high-temperature superconductors, the metallic state above the highest transition temperature is anomalous and is known as the "strange metal." We studied this state using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. With increasing doping across a temperature-independent critical value p
c ~ 0.19, we observed that near the Brillouin zone boundary, the strange metal, characterized by an incoherent spectral function, abruptly reconstructs into a more conventional metal with quasiparticles. Above the temperature of superconducting fluctuations, we found that the pseudogap also discontinuously collapses at the very same value of p
c. These observations suggest that the incoherent strange metal is a distinct state and a prerequisite for the pseudogap; such findings are incompatible with existing pseudogap quantum critical point scenarios.
57 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Distributed fiber-optic sensing technology coupled to existing subsea cables (dark fiber) allows observation of ocean and solid earth phenomena. We used an optical fiber from the cable supporting the Monterey Accelerated Research System during a 4-day maintenance period with a distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) instrument operating onshore, creating a ~10,000-component, 20-kilometer-long seismic array. Recordings of a minor earthquake wavefield identified multiple submarine fault zones. Ambient noise was dominated by shoaling ocean surface waves but also contained observations of in situ secondary microseism generation, post–low-tide bores, storm-induced sediment transport, infragravity waves, and breaking internal waves. DAS amplitudes in the microseism band tracked sea-state dynamics during a storm cycle in the northern Pacific. These observations highlight this method’s potential for marine geophysics.
58 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Robustly coherent spin centers that can be integrated into devices are a key ingredient of quantum technologies. Vacancies in semiconductors are excellent candidates, and theory predicts that defects in conjugated carbon materials should also display long coherence times. However, the quantum performance of carbon nanostructures has remained stunted by an inability to alter the sp2-carbon lattice with atomic precision. Here, we demonstrate that topological tailoring leads to superior quantum performance in molecular graphene nanostructures. We unravel the decoherence mechanisms, quantify nuclear and environmental effects, and observe spin-coherence times that outclass most nanomaterials. These results validate long-standing assumptions on the coherent behavior of topological defects in graphene and open up the possibility of introducing controlled quantum-coherent centers in the upcoming generation of carbon-based optoelectronic, electronic, and bioactive systems.
59 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Femtochemistry techniques have been instrumental in accessing the short time scales necessary to probe transient intermediates in chemical reactions. In this study, we took the contrasting approach of prolonging the lifetime of an intermediate by preparing reactant molecules in their lowest rovibronic quantum state at ultralow temperatures, thereby markedly reducing the number of exit channels accessible upon their mutual collision. Using ionization spectroscopy and velocity-map imaging of a trapped gas of potassium-rubidium (KRb) molecules at a temperature of 500 nanokelvin, we directly observed reactants, intermediates, and products of the reaction 40K87Rb + 40K87Rb -> K2Rb2* -> K2 + Rb2. Beyond observation of a long-lived, energy-rich intermediate complex, this technique opens the door to further studies of quantum-state–resolved reaction dynamics in the ultracold regime.
60 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Elastocaloric cooling, a solid-state cooling technology, exploits the latent heat released and absorbed by stress-induced phase transformations. Hysteresis associated with transformation, however, is detrimental to efficient energy conversion and functional durability. We have created thermodynamically efficient, low-hysteresis elastocaloric cooling materials by means of additive manufacturing of nickel-titanium. The use of a localized molten environment and near-eutectic mixing of elemental powders has led to the formation of nanocomposite microstructures composed of a nickel-rich intermetallic compound interspersed among a binary alloy matrix. The microstructure allowed extremely small hysteresis in quasi-linear stress-strain behaviors—enhancing the materials efficiency by a factor of four to seven—and repeatable elastocaloric performance over 1 million cycles. Implementing additive manufacturing to elastocaloric cooling materials enables distinct microstructure control of high-performance metallic refrigerants with long fatigue life.
61 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
The successful implementation of spin-wave devices requires efficient modulation of spin-wave propagation. Using cobalt/nickel multilayer films, we experimentally demonstrate that nanometer-wide magnetic domain walls can be applied to manipulate the phase and magnitude of coherent spin waves in a nonvolatile manner. We further show that a spin wave can, in turn, be used to change the position of magnetic domain walls by means of the spin-transfer torque effect generated from magnon spin current. This mutual interaction between spin waves and magnetic domain walls opens up the possibility of realizing all-magnon spintronic devices, in which one spin-wave signal can be used to control others by reconfiguring magnetic domain structures.
62 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Widespread applications of magnetic devices require an efficient means to manipulate the local magnetization. One mechanism is the electrical spin-transfer torque associated with electron-mediated spin currents; however, this suffers from substantial energy dissipation caused by Joule heating. We experimentally demonstrated an alternative approach based on magnon currents and achieved magnon-torque–induced magnetization switching in Bi2Se3/antiferromagnetic insulator NiO/ferromagnet devices at room temperature. The magnon currents carry spin angular momentum efficiently without involving moving electrons through a 25-nanometer-thick NiO layer. The magnon torque is sufficient to control the magnetization, which is comparable with previously observed electrical spin torque ratios. This research, which is relevant to the energy-efficient control of spintronic devices, will invigorate magnon-based memory and logic devices.
63 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
ParABS systems facilitate chromosome segregation and plasmid partitioning in bacteria and archaea. ParB protein binds centromeric parS DNA sequences and spreads to flanking DNA. We show that ParB is an enzyme that hydrolyzes cytidine triphosphate (CTP) to cytidine diphosphate (CDP). parS DNA stimulates cooperative CTP binding by ParB and CTP hydrolysis. A nucleotide cocrystal structure elucidates the catalytic center of the dimerization-dependent ParB CTPase. Single-molecule imaging and biochemical assays recapitulate features of ParB spreading from parS in the presence but not absence of CTP. These findings suggest that centromeres assemble by self-loading of ParB DNA sliding clamps at parS. ParB CTPase is not related to known nucleotide hydrolases and might be a promising target for developing new classes of antibiotics.
64 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Noncoding genetic variation is a major driver of phenotypic diversity, but functional interpretation is challenging. To better understand common genetic variation associated with brain diseases, we defined noncoding regulatory regions for major cell types of the human brain. Whereas psychiatric disorders were primarily associated with variants in transcriptional enhancers and promoters in neurons, sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD) variants were largely confined to microglia enhancers. Interactome maps connecting disease-risk variants in cell-type–specific enhancers to promoters revealed an extended microglia gene network in AD. Deletion of a microglia-specific enhancer harboring AD-risk variants ablated BIN1 expression in microglia, but not in neurons or astrocytes. These findings revise and expand the list of genes likely to be influenced by noncoding variants in AD and suggest the probable cell types in which they function.
65 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsids can deliver transformative gene therapies, but our understanding of AAV biology remains incomplete. We generated the complete first-order AAV2 capsid fitness landscape, characterizing all single-codon substitutions, insertions, and deletions across multiple functions relevant for in vivo delivery. We discovered a frameshifted gene in the VP1 region that expresses a membrane-associated accessory protein that limits AAV production through competitive exclusion. Mutant biodistribution revealed the importance of both surface-exposed and buried residues, with a few phenotypic profiles characterizing most variants. Finally, we algorithmically designed and experimentally verified a diverse in vivo targeted capsid library with viability far exceeding random mutagenesis approaches. These results demonstrate the power of systematic mutagenesis for deciphering complex genomes and the potential of empirical machine-guided protein engineering.
66 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Disruption of intestinal microbial communities appears to underlie many human illnesses, but the mechanisms that promote this dysbiosis and its adverse consequences are poorly understood. In patients who received allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT), we describe a high incidence of enterococcal expansion, which was associated with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and mortality. We found that Enterococcus also expands in the mouse gastrointestinal tract after allo-HCT and exacerbates disease severity in gnotobiotic models. Enterococcus growth is dependent on the disaccharide lactose, and dietary lactose depletion attenuates Enterococcus outgrowth and reduces the severity of GVHD in mice. Allo-HCT patients carrying lactose-nonabsorber genotypes showed compromised clearance of postantibiotic Enterococcus domination. We report lactose as a common nutrient that drives expansion of a commensal bacterium that exacerbates an intestinal and systemic inflammatory disease.
67 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
To understand membrane protein biogenesis, we need to explore folding within a bilayer context. Here, we describe a single-molecule force microscopy technique that monitors the folding of helical membrane proteins in vesicle and bicelle environments. After completely unfolding the protein at high force, we lower the force to initiate folding while transmembrane helices are aligned in a zigzag manner within the bilayer, thereby imposing minimal constraints on folding. We used the approach to characterize the folding pathways of the Escherichia coli rhomboid protease GlpG and the human β2-adrenergic receptor. Despite their evolutionary distance, both proteins fold in a strict N-to-C-terminal fashion, accruing structures in units of helical hairpins. These common features suggest that integral helical membrane proteins have evolved to maximize their fitness with cotranslational folding.
68 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00

Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1157?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1157 1157
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
69 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Authors: Gastel B.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/366/6469/1162?rss=1
Citation: Vol 366 No. 6469 (2019) pp 1162 1162
Publication Date: 2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
Journal: Science
70 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:10-08:00
The dense circuit structure of mammalian cerebral cortex is still unknown. With developments in three-dimensional electron microscopy, the imaging of sizable volumes of neuropil has become possible, but dense reconstruction of connectomes is the limiting step. We reconstructed a volume of ~500,000 cubic micrometers from layer 4 of mouse barrel cortex, ~300 times larger than previous dense reconstructions from the mammalian cerebral cortex. The connectomic data allowed the extraction of inhibitory and excitatory neuron subtypes that were not predictable from geometric information. We quantified connectomic imprints consistent with Hebbian synaptic weight adaptation, which yielded upper bounds for the fraction of the circuit consistent with saturated long-term potentiation. These data establish an approach for the locally dense connectomic phenotyping of neuronal circuitry in the mammalian cortex.
71 show abstract
2019-11-28T10:46:11-08:00
Adverse events need to be quickly evaluated and memorized, yet how these processes are coordinated is poorly understood. We discovered a large population of excitatory neurons in mouse median raphe region (MRR) expressing vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2) that received inputs from several negative experience–related brain centers, projected to the main aversion centers, and activated the septohippocampal system pivotal for learning of adverse events. These neurons were selectively activated by aversive but not rewarding stimuli. Their stimulation induced place aversion, aggression, depression-related anhedonia, and suppression of reward-seeking behavior and memory acquisition–promoting hippocampal theta oscillations. By contrast, their suppression impaired both contextual and cued fear memory formation. These results suggest that MRR vGluT2 neurons are crucial for the acquisition of negative experiences and may play a central role in depression-related mood disorders.

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