Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 106904
Title On-site and Off-site Effects of Wind Erosion on European Light Soils
Author(s) Riksen, M.J.P.M.; Graaff, J. de
Source Land Degradation and Development 12 (2001). - ISSN 1085-3278 - p. 1 - 11.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1002/ldr.423
Department(s) Erosion and Soil and Water Conservation
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2001
Abstract In intensively cultivated areas with light soils in Europe, wind erosion can have important on-site and off-site effects. In the framework of the EU research project Wind Erosion and European Light Soils (WEELS), an assessment has been made of these effects and of the order of magnitude of the damage and costs caused by these effects. An analysis is made of the land use and cropping in four selected sites, and farmers have provided information about the damage of wind erosion. This damage consists mainly of crop losses and additional inputs in the case of resowing. Detailed information from one of these sites shows that depending on the crop the average annual on-site costs in high-risk areas amount to about 60 per hectare. However, for sugar beet and oilseed rape the costs can be once in five years as much as 500 per hectare. Farmers are generally well aware of the erosion risk and do apply a variety of control measures. With these measures the average annual costs of wind erosion can be reduced significantly.
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