Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 109862
Title Genetic parameters for cystic ovarian disease in Dutch Black and White dairy cattle
Author(s) Hooijer, G.A.; Lubbers, R.B.F.; Ducro, B.J.; Arendonk, J.A.M. van; Kaal-Lansbergen, L.M.T.E.; Lende, T. van der
Source Journal of Dairy Science 84 (2001)1. - ISSN 0022-0302 - p. 286 - 291.
DOI https://doi.org/10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(01)74478-5
Department(s) Animal Breeding and Genomics
WIAS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2001
Abstract Cystic ovarian disease (COD) is one of the most frequently diagnosed gynecological findings in dairy cattle. It causes temporary infertility and is likely to affect reproduction as well as production parameters in cows. The objectives of this study were to investigate the heritability of COD in a Dutch Black and White population and to estimate the genetic and phenotypic relationships with milk production traits. In the data set used, the overall incidence of COD was 7.7ø1204 COD diagnoses in 15,562 lactations). The farm incidence varied between 1.9 and 11.3ÐThe estimated heritabilities on the underlying and observable scales were 0.102 and 0.087, respectively. The genetic correlations between COD and 305-d milk, fat, and protein yields were 0.345, 0.379, and 0.441, respectively. We concluded that a genetic predisposition for COD exists in Dutch Black and White dairy cattle. The genetic correlations between COD and yield traits indicate that ongoing selection for production will increase the incidence of COD.
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