Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 325475
Title Who gains, who loses? Welfare effects of classical swine fever epidemics in the Netherlands
Author(s) Mangen, M.J.J.; Burrell, A.M.
Source European Review of Agricultural Economics 30 (2003)2. - ISSN 0165-1587 - p. 125 - 154.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1093/erae/30.2.125
Department(s) LEI Markt en Ketens
Agricultural Economics and Rural Policy
MGS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2003
Keyword(s) stochastic simulation - control strategies - eradication program - disease control - mouth-disease - impact - model - australia - evaluate - events
Abstract A sectoral market model and a stochastic epidemiological model were used to simulate the effects of classical swine fever (CSF) epidemics in the Netherlands in 1997-1998. Compulsory EU control measures were implemented. Welfare changes of Dutch stakeholders, as well as government costs, were calculated. In a medium-sized epidemic without export restrictions, pig producers' surplus increased by Euro 502 million, but producers within quarantine areas lost. Consumer surplus fell by Euro 552 million. With a ban on live pig exports, pig producers collectively lost whereas consumers gained or experienced only a small loss. Government costs were lower when exports were banned, although net welfare losses were higher. Net welfare losses increased more than proportionately with epidemic size.
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