Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 332976
Title Ecological linkages between aboveground and belowground biota
Author(s) Wardle, D.A.; Bardgett, R.D.; Klironomos, J.N.; Setälä, H.; Putten, W.H. van der; Wall, D.H.
Source Science 304 (2004)5677. - ISSN 0036-8075 - p. 1629 - 1633.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1094875
Department(s) Laboratory of Nematology
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2004
Keyword(s) arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi - plant community structure - elevated carbon-dioxide - soil biota - host-plant - ecosystem properties - species-diversity - boreal forests - nitrogen - grassland
Abstract All terrestrial ecosystems consist of aboveground and belowground components that interact to influence community- and ecosystem-level processes and properties. Here we show how these components are closely interlinked at the community level, reinforced by a greater degree of specificity between plants and soil organisms than has been previously supposed. As such, aboveground and belowground communities can be powerful mutual drivers, with both positive and negative feedbacks. A combined aboveground-belowground approach to community and ecosystem ecology is enhancing our understanding of the regulation and functional significance of biodiversity and of the environmental impacts of human-induced global change phenomena.
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