Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 333362
Title Vaccinations in pig health care in the Netherlands - analysis of a questionnaire among veterinarians = Vaccinaties in de Nederlandse varkensgezondheidszorganalyse van een enquete onder dierenartsen
Author(s) Groot, J. de; Eijck, I.A.J.M.; Boersma, W.J.A.
Source Tijdschrift voor Diergeneeskunde 129 (2004). - ISSN 0040-7453 - p. 252 - 260.
Department(s) Adaptation Physiology
ID - Dier en Omgeving
Research Institute for Animal Husbandry
ID - Infectieziekten
WIAS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2004
Keyword(s) acellular pertussis - stress - performance
Abstract Veterinarians specializing in pig health care responded to a questionnaire regarding their experiences with vaccinations. The goal of the questionnaire was to gain insight into a) the reasons for vaccination and b) the factors involved in the effficacy of vaccination. The results indicated that vaccinations were typically initiated because of health problems at the farm. Veterinarians worked together with farmers and other concerned parties to initiate vaccinations. Respondents predicted that the number of vaccinations would decrease substantially with optimal farm management, but would increase if farmers were allowed (under strict conditions) to vaccinate their own pigs. The results further indicated that the nature of financial compensation predicted the rate of vaccination. Veterinarians paid according to a fixed 'fee for service' system vaccinated less frequently than did veterinarians who were paid according to an ongoing farm management contract. In conclusion, veterinarians appear to be restricted in their capacity to disseminate their experience and knowledge due to the competing needs of the farming network (animals, farmers, retailers).
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