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Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 333506
Title Effect of synthetic iron colloids on the microbiological NH4+ removal process during groundwater purification
Author(s) Wolthoorn, A.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van
Source Water Research 38 (2004)7. - ISSN 0043-1354 - p. 1884 - 1892.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2003.12.026
Department(s) Sub-department of Soil Quality
Soil Chemistry and Chemical Soil Quality
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2004
Keyword(s) ammonium - ijzer - grondwater - waterzuivering - verwijdering - drinkwater - beluchting - colloïden - grondwaterwinning - ammonium - iron - groundwater - water treatment - removal - drinking water - aeration - colloids - groundwater extraction - transient-behavior - drinking-water - transport - nitrification - phosphate - column - mobilization - nitrosomonas - adsorption - sediments
Categories Soil Physics / Water Supply
Abstract Subsurface aeration is used to oxidise Fe in situ in groundwater that is used to make drinking water potable. In a groundwater system with pH>7 subsurface aeration results in non-mobile Fe precipitate and mobile Fe colloids. Since originally the goal of subsurface aeration is to remove iron in situ, the formation of non-mobile iron precipitate, which facilitates the metal's removal, is the desired result. In addition to this intended effect, subsurface aeration may also strongly enhance the microbiological removal of ammonium (NH4+) in the purification station. Mobile iron colloids could be the link between subsurface aeration and the positive effect on the NH4+ removal process. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess whether synthetic iron colloids could improve the NH4+ removal process. The effect of synthetic iron colloids on the NH4+ removal process was studied using an artificial purification set-up on a laboratory scale
Subsurface aeration is used to oxidise Fe in situ in groundwater that is used to make drinking water potable. In a groundwater system with pH > 7 subsurface aeration results in non-mobile Fe precipitate and mobile Fe colloids. Since originally the goal of subsurface aeration is to remove iron in situ, the formation of non-mobile iron precipitate, which facilitates the metal's removal, is the desired result. In addition to this intended effect, subsurface aeration may also strongly enhance the microbiological removal of ammonium (NH4+) in the purification station. Mobile iron colloids 4 could be the link between subsurface aeration and the positive effect on the NH4+ removal process. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess whether synthetic iron colloids could improve the NH4+ removal process. The effect of synthetic iron colloids on the NH4+ removal process was studied using an artificial purification set-up on a laboratory scale. Columns that purified groundwater with or without added synthetic iron colloids were set up in duplicate. The results showed that the NH4+ removal was significantly (alpha = 0.05) increased in columns treated with the synthetic iron colloids. Cumulative after 4 months about 10% more NH4+ was nitrified in the columns that was treated with the groundwater containing synthetic iron colloids. The results support the hypothesis that mobile iron colloids could be the link between subsurface aeration and the positive effect on the NH4+ removal process. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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