Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 348873
Title Transport-related fringe benefits: implications for moving and the journey to work
Author(s) Ommeren, Jos van; Vlist, A.J. van der; Nijkamp, Peter
Source Journal of Regional Science 46 (2006)3. - ISSN 0022-4146 - p. 493 - 506.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9787.2006.00448.x
Department(s) Business Economics
MGS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2006
Keyword(s) residential-mobility - labor-markets - job search
Abstract Firms offer compensation not only through wages, but also offer transport-related fringe benefits such as transport benefits (company cars, travel, and parking benefits) and relocation benefits to job applicants. We argue that these benefits are not randomly offered to employees, but depend on the job applicants' commuting costs. The firms' choice between these benefits affects the workers' incentive to move their residence closer to the workplace. Using information on firms' recruitment behavior in the United Kingdom, this paper shows empirically that the applicants' journey-to-work time induces firms to offer these benefits to job applicants. The implications of transport-related fringe benefits for commuting and relocation are found to be rather distinct. Transport benefits make employees less sensitive to the costs of commuting, whereas relocation benefits induce employees to move closer to the workplace.
Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.