Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 371235
Title Direct observation of adhesion and spreading of emulsion droplets at solid surfaces
Author(s) Dresselhuis, D.M.; Aken, G.A. van; Hoog, E.H.A. de; Cohen Stuart, M.A.
Source Soft Matter 4 (2008). - ISSN 1744-683X - p. 1079 - 1085.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1039/b718891a
Department(s) Physical Chemistry and Colloid Science
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2008
Keyword(s) in-water emulsions - o/w emulsions - lubrication - tribology - friction - coalescence - chocolate - membrane - tissue - layers
Abstract Sensory perception of fat is related to orally perceived in-mouth friction. From this perspective, we investigate adhesion and spreading of emulsion droplets on solid surfaces and connect it to the ability of food emulsions to lower friction. Furthermore, we study what the contribution is of the separate colloidal forces on droplet adhesion. The effect of saliva on adhesion and spreading is also briefly investigated.Using a flow cell in combination with light microscopy and video imaging allowed us to clearly distinguish between adhered and spread emulsion droplets. The capability to make this distinction between adhesion and spreading experimentally is new and provided us with the insight that the occurrence of spreading is essential for lowering friction. Mainly electrostatic, steric and hydrophobic interactions of the droplets with solid surfaces are found to determine adhesion and subsequent spreading of emulsion droplets. This was investigated by varying the adsorbed amount of protein, the ionic strength of the emulsion as well as the hydrophobicity of the solid surface. Especially the hydrophobic interaction between droplet and surface is shown to be crucial for droplet adhesion and spreading. Saliva is of minor importance for adhesion and spreading. This work gives insight in the way emulsion droplets interact with solid surfaces and the type of colloidal interactions that play a role. The information it provides can be used to develop emulsions that are reasonably stable during the shelf life of the product, but do spread on oral surfaces, thus lowering friction and enhancing fat perception
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