Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 373055
Title Species of Botryosphaeriaceae occurring on Proteaceae
Author(s) Marincowitz, S.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Wingfield, M.J.; Crous, P.W.
Source Persoonia 21 (2008). - ISSN 0031-5850 - p. 111 - 118.
DOI https://doi.org/10.3767/003158508X372387
Department(s) Laboratory of Phytopathology
EPS-4
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2008
Keyword(s) south-africa - western-cape - sp-nov - pathogens - fungi - endophytes - morphology - speciation - australia - canker
Abstract The Botryosphaeriaceae includes several species that are serious canker and leaf pathogens of Proteaceae. In the present study, sequence data for the ITS nrDNA region were used in conjunction with morphological observations to resolve the taxonomy of species of Botryosphaeriaceae associated with Proteaceae. Neofusicoccum luteum was confirmed from Buckinghamia and Banksia in Australia, and on Protea cynaroides in South Africa. A major pathogen of Banksia coccinea in Australia was shown to be N. australe and not N. luteum as previously reported. Neofusicoccum protearum was previously reported on Proteaceae from Australia, Madeira, Portugal and South Africa, and is shown here to also occur in Hawaii and Tenerife (Canary Islands). Furthermore, several previous records of N. ribis on Proteaceae were shown to be N. parvum. Saccharata capensis is described as a new species that is morphologically similar to S. proteae. There is no information currently available regarding its potential importance as plant pathogen and pathogenicity tests should be conducted with it in the future.
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