Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 374140
Title Antioxidant activity assays on-line with liquid chromatography
Author(s) Niederländer, H.A.G.; Beek, T.A. van; Barsatute, A.; Koleva, I.
Source Journal of Chromatography. A, Including electrophoresis and other separation methods 1210 (2008)2. - ISSN 0021-9673 - p. 121 - 134.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chroma.2008.09.061
Department(s) Organic Chemistry
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2008
Keyword(s) radical scavenging compounds - coulometric array detection - flow-injection system - dpph screening method - dad-spe-nmr - phenolic-compounds - electrochemical detection - natural-products - plant-extracts - chemiluminescence detection
Abstract Screening for antioxidants requires simple in vitro model systems to investigate antioxidant activity. High resolution screening (HRS), combining a separation technique like HPLC with fast post-column (bio)chemical detection can rapidly pinpoint active compounds in complex mixtures. In this paper both electrochemical and chemistry-based assays are reviewed and discussed. The focus is on the mechanisms involved and differences between the assays, rather than on the matrix or analytes. With 45 applications high resolution antioxidant screening has now become an almost routine tool for the rapid identification of antioxidants in plant extracts, foods and beverages. The methods based on true reactive oxygen species (ROS) provide the most realistic measure of antioxidant activity. Unfortunately these methods are difficult to set up and control and have not been applied since they were reported. The methods based on electrochemical detection are more practical, but have still received only limited attention for practical screening purposes. The methods based on a single relatively stable reagent such as DPPH and ABTS+ have become most popular, because of their simple set-up and ease of control. The methods have been combined with on-line DAD, MS and NMR detection for rapid identification of active constituents.
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