Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 381011
Title Seasonal differences in leaf-level physiology give lianas a competitive advantage over trees in a tropical seasonal forest
Author(s) Cai, Z.Q.; Schnitzer, S.A.; Bongers, F.
Source Oecologia 161 (2009)1. - ISSN 0029-8549 - p. 25 - 33.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-009-1355-4
Department(s) Forest Ecology and Forest Management
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2009
Keyword(s) barro-colorado island - rain-forest - eastern amazonia - functional-groups - secondary forest - nitrogen-content - climbing plants - elevated co2 - moist forest - dry forest
Abstract Lianas are an important component of most tropical forests, where they vary in abundance from high in seasonal forests to low in aseasonal forests. We tested the hypothesis that the physiological ability of lianas to fix carbon (and thus grow) during seasonal drought may confer a distinct advantage in seasonal tropical forests, which may explain pan-tropical liana distributions. We compared a range of leaf-level physiological attributes of 18 co-occurring liana and 16 tree species during the wet and dry seasons in a tropical seasonal forest in Xishuangbanna, China. We found that, during the wet season, lianas had significantly higher CO2 assimilation per unit mass (A mass), nitrogen concentration (N mass), and ¿13C values, and lower leaf mass per unit area (LMA) than trees, indicating that lianas have higher assimilation rates per unit leaf mass and higher integrated water-use efficiency (WUE), but lower leaf structural investments. Seasonal variation in CO2 assimilation per unit area (A area), phosphorus concentration per unit mass (P mass), and photosynthetic N-use efficiency (PNUE), however, was significantly lower in lianas than in trees. For instance, mean tree A area decreased by 30.1% from wet to dry season, compared with only 12.8% for lianas. In contrast, from the wet to dry season mean liana ¿13C increased four times more than tree ¿13C, with no reduction in PNUE, whereas trees had a significant reduction in PNUE. Lianas had higher A mass than trees throughout the year, regardless of season. Collectively, our findings indicate that lianas fix more carbon and use water and nitrogen more efficiently than trees, particularly during seasonal drought, which may confer a competitive advantage to lianas during the dry season, and thus may explain their high relative abundance in seasonal tropical forests
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