Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 381614
Title Uncertainties in climate responses to past land cover change: First results from the LUCID intercomparison study
Author(s) Pitman, A.J.; Noblet-Ducoudré, N. de; Cruz, F.T.; Davin, E.L.; Bonan, G.B.; Brovkin, V.; Claussen, M.; Delire, C.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Gayler, V.; Hurk, B.J.J.M. van den; Lawrence, P.J.; Molen, M.K. van der; Müller, C.; Reick, C.H.; Senevirantne, S.I.; Strengers, B.J.; Voldoire, A.
Source Geophysical Research Letters 36 (2009). - ISSN 0094-8276 - 6 p.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1029/2009GL039076
Department(s) Earth System Science
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2009
Keyword(s) tropical deforestation - feedbacks - scale
Abstract Seven climate models were used to explore the biogeophysical impacts of human-induced land cover change (LCC) at regional and global scales. The imposed LCC led to statistically significant decreases in the northern hemisphere summer latent heat flux in three models, and increases in three models. Five models simulated statistically significant cooling in summer in near-surface temperature over regions of LCC and one simulated warming. There were few significant changes in precipitation. Our results show no common remote impacts of LCC. The lack of consistency among the seven models was due to: 1) the implementation of LCC despite agreed maps of agricultural land, 2) the representation of crop phenology, 3) the parameterisation of albedo, and 4) the representation of evapotranspiration for different land cover types. This study highlights a dilemma: LCC is regionally significant, but it is not feasible to impose a common LCC across multiple models for the next IPCC assessment
Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.