Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 382540
Title Landsliding and its multiscale influence on mountainscapes
Author(s) Restrepo, C.; Walker, L.R.; Bussmann, R.; Claessens, L.
Source Bioscience 59 (2009)8. - ISSN 0006-3568 - p. 685 - 698.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1525/bio.2009.59.8.10
Department(s) Land Dynamics
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2009
Keyword(s) puerto-rican landslides - british-columbia - new-zealand - land-cover - vegetation - forest - soil - disturbance - succession - recovery
Abstract Landsliding is a complex process that modifies mountainscapes worldwide. Its severe and sometimes long-lasting negative effects contrast with the less-documented positive effects on ecosystems, raising numerous questions about the dual role of landsliding, the feedbacks between biotic and geomorphic processes, and, ultimately, the ecological and evolutionary responses of organisms. We present a conceptual model in which feedbacks between biotic and geomorphic processes, landslides, and ecosystem attributes are hypothesized to drive the dynamics of mountain ecosystems at multiple scales. This model is used to integrate and synthesize a rich, but fragmented, body of literature generated in different disciplines, and to highlight the need for profitable collaborations between biologists and geoscientists. Such efforts should help identify attributes that contribute to the resilience of mountain ecosystems, and also should help in conservation, restoration, and hazard assessment. Given the sensitivity of mountains to land-use and global climate change, these endeavors are both relevant and timely
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