Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 384989
Title The ecological stoichiometry of toxins produced by harmful cyanobacteria: an experimental test of the carbonnutrient balance hypothesis
Author(s) Waal, D.B. van de; Verspagen, J.M.H.; Lürling, M.F.L.L.W.; Donk, E. van; Visser, P.M.; Huisman, J.
Source Ecology Letters 12 (2009)2. - ISSN 1461-023X - p. 1326 - 1335.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1461-0248.2009.01383.x
Department(s) Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2009
Keyword(s) limited microcystis-aeruginosa - planktothrix-agardhii - inorganic carbon - growth-rate - light - nitrogen - phytoplankton - population - metabolism - blooms
Abstract The elemental composition of primary producers reflects the availability of light, carbon and nutrients in their environment. According to the carbon-nutrient balance hypothesis, this has implications for the production of secondary metabolites. To test this hypothesis, we investigated a family of toxins, known as microcystins, produced by harmful cyanobacteria. The strain Microcystis aeruginosa HUB 5-2-4, which produces several microcystin variants of different N:C stoichiometry, was cultured in chemostats supplied with various combinations of nitrate and CO2. Excess supply of both nitrogen and carbon yielded high cellular N:C ratios accompanied by high cellular contents of total microcystin and the nitrogen-rich variant microcystin-RR. Comparable patterns were found in Microcystis-dominated lakes, where the relative microcystin-RR content increased with the seston N:C ratio. In total, our results are largely consistent with the carbon-nutrient balance hypothesis, and warn that a combination of rising CO2 and nitrogen enrichment will affect the microcystin composition of harmful cyanobacteria
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