Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 385022
Title Effects of exercise on l-carnitine and lipid metabolism in African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) fed different dietary l-carnitine and lipid levels
Author(s) Ozorio, R.O.A.; Ginneken, V.J.T. van; Bessa, R.J.B.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Huisman, E.A.
Source The British journal of nutrition 103 (2010)8. - ISSN 0007-1145 - p. 1139 - 1150.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114509993035
Department(s) Aquaculture and Fisheries
Animal Nutrition
WIAS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2010
Keyword(s) trout oncorhynchus-mykiss - bream pagrus-major - high-fat diets - salmo-salar l - rainbow-trout - growth-performance - exhaustive exercise - nutritional supplements - intermediary metabolism - swimming performance
Abstract African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) were fed four isonitrogenous diets (34 % crude protein), each containing one of two lipid (100 or 180 g/kg) and two l-carnitine (15 or 1000 mg/kg) levels. After 81 d of feeding, thirty-two fish (body weight 32 g) from each dietary group were randomly selected, sixteen fish were induced to a 3-h swim (speed of 1.5 body length (BL)/s), while the other sixteen fish were kept under resting condition. Fish fed 1000 mg l-carnitine accumulated 3.5 and 5 times more l-carnitine in plasma and muscle, respectively, than fish fed the 15 mg l-carnitine. Muscle l-carnitine content was significantly lower in exercised fish than in rested fish. High dietary lipid level (fish oil) led to an increase in muscle n-3 PUFA content and a decrease in SFA and MUFA content. In liver, the increase in dietary lipid level resulted in an increased levels of both n-6 and n-3 PUFA. l-carnitine supplementation significantly decreased n-3 PUFA content. Exercise decreased n-3 PUFA in both muscle and liver. Plasma lactate and lactate dehydrogenase, normally associated with increased glycolytic processes, were positively correlated with exercise and inversely correlated with dietary l-carnitine level. l-carnitine supplementation reduced significantly the RQ from 0.72 to 0.63, and an interaction between dietary l-carnitine and lipid was observed (P <0.03). Our results indicate that an increase in fatty acids (FA) intake may promote FA oxidation, and both carnitine and exercise might influence the regulation of FA oxidation selectivity.
Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.