Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 385212
Title Identification of unknown residues : using bioassay directed fractionation, UPLC/TOFMS analysis and database searching
Author(s) Peters, R.J.B.; Rijk, J.C.W.; Oosterink, J.E.; Nijrolder, A.W.J.M.; Nielen, M.W.F.
Source Wageningen : Rikilt - Institute of Food Safety (Report / RIKILT 2009.013) - 47
Department(s) BU Microbiological & Chemical Food Analysis
RIKILT - Business Unit Safety & Health
Publication type Research report
Publication year 2009
Keyword(s) residuen - analytische methoden - biotesten - vloeistofchromatografie - massaspectrometrie - residues - analytical methods - bioassays - liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry
Categories Analytical Chemistry
Abstract Nowadays a large number of compounds are determined in environmental and food samples. Biological tests are used to screen samples for large groups of compounds having a particular effect, but it is often difficult to identify a specific compound when a positive effect is observed. The identification of an unknown compound is a challenge for analytical chemistry in environmental analysis, food analysis, as well as in clinical and forensic toxicology. This study reports on the development of a procedure for the identification of unknown residues in samples suspected of containing illegal substances and samples showing bioactivity in bioassay - or microbiological screening assays. For testing purposes several samples were selected; a number of so-called "cold cases", historical samples that were suspected of containing illegal growth promoting substances, herbal mixtures and sport supplements.
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