Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 393215
Title Dynamics and ecological consequences of avian influenza virus infection in greater white-fronted geese in their winter staging areas
Author(s) Kleijn, D.; Munster, V.J.; Ebbinge, B.S.; Jonkers, D.A.; Müskens, G.J.D.M.; Randen, Y. van; Fouchier, R.A.M.
Source Proceedings of the Royal Society. B: Biological Sciences 277 (2010)1690. - ISSN 0962-8452 - p. 2041 - 2048.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2010.0026
Department(s) Centre for Ecosystem Studies
CE - Molecular Ecology Ecotoxicology and Wildlife Management
Plant Ecology and Nature Conservation
Landscape Centre
CGI - Spatial Models and Knowledge Systems
Wageningen Environmental Research
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2010
Keyword(s) wild mallard ducks - affect body condition - a virus - migratory waterfowl - branta-canadensis - north-america - vice-versa - birds - h5n1 - paramyxoviruses
Abstract Recent outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in poultry have raised interest in the interplay between avian influenza (AI) viruses and their wild hosts. Studies linking virus ecology to host ecology are still scarce, particularly for non-duck species. Here, we link capture–resighting data of greater white-fronted geese Anser albifrons albifrons with the AI virus infection data collected during capture in The Netherlands in four consecutive winters. We ask what factors are related to AI virus prevalence and whether there are ecological consequences associated with AI virus infection in staging white-fronted geese. Mean seasonal (low pathogenic) AI virus prevalence ranged between 2.5 and 10.7 per cent, among the highest reported values for non-duck species, and occurred in distinct peaks with near-zero prevalence before and after. Throat samples had a 2.4 times higher detection frequency than cloacal samples. AI virus infection was significantly related to age and body mass in some but not other winters. AI virus infection was not related to resighting probability, nor to maximum distance travelled, which was at least 191 km during the short infectious lifespan of an AI virus. Our results suggest that transmission via the respiratory route could be an important transmission route of AI virus in this species. Near-zero prevalence upon arrival on their wintering grounds, in combination with the epidemic nature of AI virus infections in white-fronted geese, suggests that white-fronted geese are not likely to disperse Asian AI viruses from their Siberian breeding grounds to their European wintering areas.
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