Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 398810
Title (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage
Author(s) Balk, M.; Mehboob, F.; Gelder, A.H. van; Rijpstra, I.; Sinninghe-Damsté, J.S.; Stams, A.J.M.
Source Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology 88 (2010)2. - ISSN 0175-7598 - p. 595 - 603.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s00253-010-2788-8
Department(s) Microbiology
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2010
Keyword(s) sp-nov - homoacetogenic bacterium - strain gr-1 - perchlorate - chlorate - metabolism - water - milk - soil - identification
Abstract A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5-0.8 microm in diameter, and 2-8 microm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37 degrees C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H(2)/CO(2) to acetate, usually as the only product. Succinate was decarboxylated to propionate. The isolate was able to respire with (per)chlorate, nitrate, and CO(2). The G+C content of the DNA was 42.6 mol%. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain An4 was most closely related to Sporomusa ovata (98% similarity). The bacterium reduced perchlorate and chlorate completely to chloride. Key enzymes, perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, were detected in cell-free extracts
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