Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 435782
Title A large-scale evaluation of computational protein function prediction
Author(s) Radivojac, P.; Clark, W.T.; Oron, T.R.; Schnoes, A.M.; Wittkop, T.; Kourmpetis, Y.A.I.; Dijk, A.D.J. van; Friedberg, I.
Source Nature Methods : techniques for life scientists and chemists 10 (2013). - ISSN 1548-7091 - p. 221 - 227.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1038/nmeth.2340
Department(s) BIOS Applied Bioinformatics
Mathematical and Statistical Methods - Biometris
Biometris
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) gene ontology - sequence - rna - annotation - database - network - genomes - gold
Abstract Automated annotation of protein function is challenging. As the number of sequenced genomes rapidly grows, the overwhelming majority of protein products can only be annotated computationally. If computational predictions are to be relied upon, it is crucial that the accuracy of these methods be high. Here we report the results from the first large-scale community-based critical assessment of protein function annotation (CAFA) experiment. Fifty-four methods representing the state of the art for protein function prediction were evaluated on a target set of 866 proteins from 11 organisms. Two findings stand out: (i) today's best protein function prediction algorithms substantially outperform widely used first-generation methods, with large gains on all types of targets; and (ii) although the top methods perform well enough to guide experiments, there is considerable need for improvement of currently available tools.
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