Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 436883
Title Carbon flows, carbon markets, and low-carbon lifestyles: reflecting on the role of markets in climate governance
Author(s) Spaargaren, G.; Mol, A.P.J.
Source Environmental Politics 22 (2013)1. - ISSN 0964-4016 - p. 174 - 193.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/09644016.2013.755840
Department(s) Environmental Policy
WASS
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) ecological modernization - sustainable consumption - governance - environment - modernity - politics
Abstract The role of carbon markets in governing global carbon flows triggers substantial debates among policymakers, social movements and social scientists. The present debate on carbon markets is different from the earlier debate on market-based instruments in environmental politics. Carbon markets represent both more radical and more risky forms of governing global carbon flows, as illustrated by an analysis of both regulatory and voluntary carbon markets operating on the global and personal level. To make use of their environmental potential and to prevent them from generating perverse consequences, carbon markets are to be regulated by state, market and civil society authorities. Embedding carbon markets in civil society means connecting carbon flows to the households and the lifestyles of citizen-consumers in a direct and meaningful manner, which can increase legitimacy and foreground climate change politics among citizen-consumers.
Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.