Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 441179
Title ABA-deficiency results in reduced plant and fruit size in tomato
Author(s) Nitsch, L.; Kohlen, W.; Oplaat, C.; Charnikhova, T.; Cristescu, S.; Michieli, P.; Wolters-Arts, M.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Mariani, C.; Vriezen, W.H.; Rieu, I.
Source Journal of Plant Physiology 169 (2012)9. - ISSN 0176-1617 - p. 878 - 883.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jplph.2012.02.004
Department(s) Laboratory of Plant Physiology
EPS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) abscisic-acid biosynthesis - shoot growth - arabidopsis-thaliana - endogenous aba - ethylene - mutants - drought - stress - gene - expression
Abstract Abscisic acid (ABA) deficient mutants, such as notabilis and flacca, have helped elucidating the role of ABA during plant development and stress responses in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). However, these mutants have only moderately decreased ABA levels. Here we report on plant and fruit development in the more strongly ABA-deficient notabilis/flacca (not/flc) double mutant. We observed that plant growth, leaf-surface area, drought-induced wilting and ABA-related gene expression in the different genotypes were strongly correlated with the ABA levels and thus most strongly affected in the not/flc double mutants. These mutants also had reduced fruit size that was caused by an overall smaller cell size. Lower ABA levels in fruits did not correlate with changes in auxin levels, but were accompanied by higher ethylene evolution rates. This suggests that in a wild-type background ABA stimulates cell enlargement during tomato fruit growth via a negative effect on ethylene synthesis.
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