Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 441565
Title Protein transfer to membranes upon shape deformation
Author(s) Sagis, L.M.C.; Bijl, E.; Antono, L.; Ruijter, N.C.A. de; Valenberg, H.J.F. van
Source The European Physical Journal. Special Topics 222 (2013)1. - ISSN 1951-6355 - p. 61 - 71.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1140/epjst/e2013-01826-y
Department(s) Physics and Physical Chemistry of Foods
Food Quality and Design
Laboratory of Cell Biology
VLAG
WIAS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) blood-cell deformability - in-water emulsions - fat globule size - interfacial permeability - flow - drops - milk - dissolution - infections - adsorption
Abstract Red blood cells, milk fat droplets, or liposomes all have interfaces consisting of lipid membranes. These particles show significant shape deformations as a result of flow. Here we show that these shape deformations can induce adsorption of proteins to the membrane. Red blood cell deformability is an important factor in several diseases involving obstructions of the microcirculatory system, and deformation induced protein adsorption will alter the rigidity of their membranes. Deformation induced protein transfer will also affect adsorption of cells onto implant surfaces, and the performance of liposome based controlled release systems. Quantitative models describing this phenomenon in biomaterials do not exist. Using a simple quantitative model, we provide new insight in this phenomenon. We present data that show convincingly that for cells or droplets with diameters upwards of a few micrometers, shape deformations induce adsorption of proteins at their interface even at moderate flow rates.
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