Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 442273
Title Intestinal colonization: How key microbial players become established in this dynamic process: Microbial metabolic activities and the interplay between the host and microbes
Author(s) Aidy, S.F. El; Abbeele, P. van den; Wiele, T. van der; Louis, P.; Kleerebezem, M.
Source Bioessays 35 (2013)10. - ISSN 0265-9247 - p. 913 - 923.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1002/bies.201300073
Department(s) Microbiology
Host-Microbe Interactomics
WIAS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) sulfate-reducing bacteria - butyrate-producing bacteria - chain fatty-acids - inflammatory bowel diseases - human gut microbiota - human colon - ulcerative-colitis - hydrogen-sulfide - immune-system - human feces
Abstract In this review, we provide an overview of the dynamic changes within the microbiota and its metabolites that are implicated in establishing and maintaining gastrointestinal homeostasis during various stages of microbial colonization. The gradual conversion of the gut microbiota toward a mutualistic microbial community involves replacement of pioneer gut colonizers with bacterial taxa that are characteristic for the adult gut. An important microbial signature of homeostasis in the adult gut is the prevalence and activity of a diverse spectrum of bacterial species that produce beneficial metabolites through metabolic interactions between microbial groups. Deciphering these microbial signatures and their metabolites that govern short and long-term equilibrium, as well as imbalances in host-microbial relationships, may provide novel diagnostic tools and/or therapeutic targets for specific disorders associated with intestinal dysbiosis and loss of homeostasis.
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