Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 449891
Title Carbon Nanofiber-Supported K2CO3 as an Efficient Low-Temperature Regenerable CO2 Sorbent for Post-Combustion Capture
Author(s) Meis, N.N.A.H.; Frey, A.M.; Bitter, J.H.; Jong, K.P. de
Source Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research 52 (2013)36. - ISSN 0888-5885 - p. 12812 - 12818.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1021/ie4017072
Department(s) Biobased Chemistry and Technology
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) metal-organic frameworks - fixed-bed operations - solid base catalysts - flue-gas - dioxide - adsorption - recovery - adsorbents - sorption - k2co3-on-carbon
Abstract This study focuses on regenerable sorbents for post-combustion CO2 capture at low temperature (373 K). K2CO3 loaded on three different supports, carbon nanofibers (CNF), alumina (¿-Al2O3), and activated carbon (AC), was investigated. K2CO3–CNF revealed excellent properties as CO2 sorbent, displaying capacities of 1.2–1.6 mmol g–1 and fast desorption kinetics at low temperatures (423 K). This temperature was too low to completely regenerate K2CO3–Al2O3 and K2CO3–AC, and consequently, these sorbents lost 8% and 50%, respectively, of their capacity after the first absorption–desorption cycle. K2CO3–CNF could be regenerated to restore 80% of its capacity with a low energy input, estimated at 2–3 GJ/ton CO2, which is competitive to currently used amines.
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