Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 450980
Title Energy from CO2 using capacitive electrodes – Theoretical outline and calculation of open circuit voltage
Author(s) Par-Garcia, J.M.; Schaetzle, O.; Biesheuvel, P.M.; Hamelers, H.V.M.
Source Journal of Colloid and Interface Science 418 (2014). - ISSN 0021-9797 - p. 200 - 207.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcis.2013.11.081
Department(s) Environmental Technology
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2014
Keyword(s) anion-exchange membranes - porous-electrodes - carbamate formation - aqueous-solution - acid anions - monoethanolamine - equilibrium - absorption - simulation - capture
Abstract Recently, a new technology has been proposed for the utilization of energy from CO2 emissions (Hamelers et al., 2014). The principle consists of controlling the dilution process of CO2–concentrated gas (e.g., exhaust gas) into CO2–dilute gas (e.g., air) thereby extracting a fraction of the released mixing energy. In this paper, we describe the theoretical fundamentals of this technology when using a pair of charge–selective capacitive electrodes. We focus on the behavior of the chemical system consisting of CO2 gas dissolved in water or monoethanolamine solution. The maximum voltage given for the capacitive cell is theoretically calculated, based on the membrane potential. The different aspects that affect this theoretical maximum value are discussed.
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