Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 451062
Title Nile perch (Lates niloticus, L.) and cichlids (Haplochromis spp.) in Lake Victoria: could prey mortality promote invasion of tis predator?
Author(s) Wolfshaar, K.E. van de; Hille Ris Lambers, R.; Goudswaard, P.C.; Rijnsdorp, A.D.; Scheffer, M.
Source Theoretical Ecology 7 (2014)3. - ISSN 1874-1738 - p. 253 - 261.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s12080-014-0215-y
Department(s) Wageningen Marine Research
Vis
Delta
Aquaculture and Fisheries
Visserij
Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management
WIAS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2014
Keyword(s) east-africa - mwanza gulf - human impact - ecosystems - productivity - coexistence - competition - recovery - kyoga
Abstract The invasion of Nile perch into Lake Victoria is one of the iconic examples of the destructive effect of an introduced species on an ecosystem but no convincing explanation exists of why Nile perch only increased dramatically after a 25 year lag. Here, we consider this problem using a mathematical model that takes into account interactions between Nile perch and its cichlid prey. We examined competing hypotheses to explain Nile perch invasion and show that suppression of juvenile Nile perch by cichlids may cause the system to have two alternative stable states: one with only cichlids and one with coexistence of cichlids and Nile perch. Without cichlid predation on Nile perch, alternative stable states did not occur. Our analysis indicates that cichlid mortality, for example fishing mortality, may have induced the observed shift between the states.
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