Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 455579
Title Influence of setup and carbon source on the bacterial community of biocathodes in microbial electrolysis cells
Author(s) Croesea, E.; Jeremiasse, A.W.; Marshall, I.P.G.; Spormann, A.M.; Euverink, G.J.W.; Geelhoed, J.S.; Stams, A.J.M.; Plugge, C.M.
Source Enzyme and Microbial Technology 61-62 (2014). - ISSN 0141-0229 - p. 67 - 75.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enzmictec.2014.04.019
Department(s) Physical Chemistry and Colloid Science
Microbiology
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2014
Keyword(s) hydrogen-production - fuel-cells - desulfovibrio-vulgaris - sp-nov. - sequence data - gen. nov. - diversity - system - classification - acetate
Abstract The microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) biocathode has shown great potential as alternative for expensive metals as catalyst for H2 synthesis. Here, the bacterial communities at the biocathode of five hydrogen producing MECs using molecular techniques were characterized. The setups differed in design (large versus small) including electrode material and flow path and in carbon source provided at the cathode (bicarbonate or acetate). A hydrogenase gene-based DNA microarray (Hydrogenase Chip) was used to analyze hydrogenase genes present in the three large setups. The small setups showed dominant groups of Firmicutes and two of the large setups showed dominant groups of Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The third large setup received acetate but no sulfate (no sulfur source). In this setup an almost pure culture of a Promicromonospora sp. developed. Most of the hydrogenase genes detected were coding for bidirectional Hox-type hydrogenases, which have shown to be involved in cytoplasmatic H2 production.
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