Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 456068
Title Human milk: a source of more life than we imagine
Author(s) Jeurink, P.V.; Bergenhenegouwen, J. van; Jimenez, E.; Knippels, L.M.J.; Fernandez, L.; Garssen, J.; Knol, J.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Martin, R.
Source Beneficial Microbes 4 (2013)1. - ISSN 1876-2883 - p. 17 - 30.
DOI https://doi.org/10.3920/BM2012.0040
Department(s) Cell Biology and Immunology
Microbiology
WIAS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) lactic-acid bacteria - human breast-milk - fragment-length-polymorphism - human skin microbiome - healthy women - infectious mastitis - dendritic cells - infant gut - staphylococcus-epidermidis - intestinal microbiota
Abstract The presence of bacteria in human milk has been acknowledged since the seventies. For a long time, microbiological analysis of human milk was only performed in case of infections and therefore the presence of non-pathogenic bacteria was yet unknown. During the last decades, the use of more sophisticated culture-dependent and -independent techniques, and the steady development of the -omic approaches are opening up the new concept of the 'milk microbiome', a complex ecosystem with a greater diversity than previously anticipated. In this review, possible mechanisms by which bacteria can reach the mammary gland (contamination versus active migration) are discussed. In addition, the potential roles of human milk for both infant and maternal health are summarised. A better understanding of the link between the milk microbiome and health benefit, the potential factors influencing this relationship and whether or not it can be influenced by nutrition is required to open new avenues in the field of pregnancy and lactation.
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