Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 456959
Title Phloem flow and sugar transport in Ricinus communis L. is inhibited under anoxic conditions of shoot or roots
Author(s) Peuke, A.D.; Gessler, A.; Trumbore, S.; Windt, C.W.; Homan, N.; Gerkema, E.; As, H. van
Source Plant, Cell & Environment 38 (2015)3. - ISSN 0140-7791 - p. 433 - 447.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/pce.12399
Department(s) Biophysics
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2015
Keyword(s) carbon-isotope composition - mushrooms agaricus-bisporus - distance water transport - organic-matter - membrane-permeability - assimilate transport - plants - leaves - starch - stress
Abstract Anoxic conditions should hamper the transport of sugar in the phloem, as this is an active process. The canopy is a carbohydrate source and the roots are carbohydrate sinks.By fumigating the shoot with N2 or flooding the rhizosphere, anoxic conditions in the source or sink, respectively, were induced. Volume flow, velocity, conducting area and stationary water of the phloem were assessed by non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) flowmetry. Carbohydrates and d13C in leaves, roots and phloem saps were determined. Following flooding, volume flow and conducting area of the phloem declined and sugar concentrations in leaves and in phloem saps slightly increased. Oligosaccharides appeared in phloem saps and after 3 d, carbon transport was reduced to 77%. Additionally, the xylem flow declined and showed finally no daily rhythm. Anoxia of the shoot resulted within minutes in a reduction of volume flow, conductive area and sucrose in the phloem sap decreased. Sugar transport dropped to below 40% by the end of the N2 treatment. However, volume flow and phloem sap sugar tended to recover during the N2 treatment. Both anoxia treatments hampered sugar transport. The flow velocity remained about constant, although phloem sap sugar concentration changed during treatments. Apparently, stored starch was remobilized under anoxia.
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