Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 457307
Title Assessment of evaporative water loss from Dutch cities
Author(s) Jacobs, C.M.J.; Elbers, J.A.; Brolsma, R.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Moors, E.J.; Rodríguez-CarreteroMárquez, M.T.; Hove, B. van
Source Building and Environment 83 (2015). - ISSN 0360-1323 - p. 27 - 38.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2014.07.005
Department(s) Climate Resilience
Meteorology and Air Quality
Earth System Science
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2015
Keyword(s) klimaatverandering - temperatuur - stedelijke gebieden - evaporatie - waterbudget - rotterdam - veluwe - climatic change - temperature - urban areas - evaporation - water budget - rotterdam - veluwe - urban heat-island - energy-balance - large-aperture - evapotranspiration - exchange - surface - scintillometers - requirements - environments - manchester
Categories Climatic Change
Abstract Reliable estimates of evaporative water loss are required to assess the urban water budget in support of division of water resources among various needs, including heat mitigation measures in cities relying on evaporative cooling. We report on urban evaporative water loss from Arnhem and Rotterdam in the Netherlands, using eddy covariance, scintillometer and sapflow observations. Evaporation is assessed at daily to seasonal and annual timescale. For the summer half-year (April–September), observations from Arnhem and Rotterdam are consistent regarding magnitude and variability of evaporation that typically varies between 0.5 and 1.0 mm of evaporation per day. The mean daily evaporative cooling rate was 20–25 Wm-2, 11–14% of the average incoming solar radiation. Evaporation by trees related to sapflow was found to be a small term on the water budget at the city or neighbourhood scale. However, locally the contribution may be significant, given observed maxima of daily sap flows up to 170 l per tree. In Arnhem, evaporation is strongly linked with precipitation, possibly owing to building style. During the summer season, 60% of the precipitation evaporated again. In Rotterdam, the link between evaporation and precipitation is much weaker. An analysis of meteorological observations shows that estimation of urban evaporation from routine weather data using the concept of reference evaporation would be a particularly challenging task. City-scale evaporation may not scale with reference evaporation and the urban fabric results in strong microweather variability. Observations like the ones presented here can be used to evaluate and improve methods for routine urban evaporation estimates.
Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.