Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 477818
Title Sex or no sex: Evolutionary adaptation occurs regardless
Author(s) Seidl, M.F.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.
Source Bioessays 36 (2014)4. - ISSN 0265-9247 - p. 335 - 345.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1002/bies.201300155
Department(s) Laboratory of Phytopathology
EPS-2
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2014
Keyword(s) horizontal gene-transfer - double-strand breaks - yeast candida-glabrata - genome evolution - transposable elements - saccharomyces-cerevisiae - mitotic recombination - avirulence gene - homologous recombination - cryptococcus-neoformans
Abstract All species continuously evolve to adapt to changing environments. The genetic variation that fosters such adaptation is caused by a plethora of mechanisms, including meiotic recombination that generates novel allelic combinations in the progeny of two parental lineages. However, a considerable number of eukaryotic species, including many fungi, do not have an apparent sexual cycle and are consequently thought to be limited in their evolutionary potential. As such organisms are expected to have reduced capability to eliminate deleterious mutations, they are often considered as evolutionary dead ends. However, inspired by recent reports we argue that such organisms can be as persistent as organisms with conventional sexual cycles through the use of other mechanisms, such as genomic rearrangements, to foster adaptation.
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