Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 483112
Title Tunable long range forces mediated by self-propelled colloidal hard spheres
Author(s) Ni, R.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Bolhuis, P.G.
Source Physical Review Letters 114 (2015). - ISSN 0031-9007 - 5 p.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.018302
Department(s) VLAG
Physical Chemistry and Soft Matter
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2015
Keyword(s) active brownian particles - phase-separation - swimmers - disks
Abstract Using Brownian dynamics simulations, we systematically study the effective interaction between two parallel hard walls in a 2D suspension of self-propelled (active) colloidal hard spheres, and we find that the effective force between two hard walls can be tuned from a long range repulsion into a long range attraction by changing the density of active particles. At relatively high densities, the active hard spheres can form a dynamic crystalline bridge, which induces a strong oscillating long range dynamic wetting repulsion between the walls. With decreasing density, the dynamic bridge gradually breaks, and an intriguing long range dynamic depletion attraction arises. A similar effect occurs in a quasi-2D suspension of self-propelled colloidal hard spheres by changing the height of the confinement. Our results open up new possibilities to manipulate the motion and assembly of microscopic objects by using active matter.
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