Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 485854
Title Host plant resistance towards the cabbage whitefly in Brassica oleracea and its wild relatives
Author(s) Pelgrom, K.T.B.; Broekgaarden, C.; Voorrips, R.E.; Bas, N.; Visser, R.G.F.; Vosman, B.J.
Source Euphytica 202 (2015)2. - ISSN 0014-2336 - p. 297 - 306.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s10681-014-1306-y
Department(s) Plant Breeding
PBR Non host and insect resistance
PRI Biodiversity and Breeding
Centrum voor Genetische Bronnen Nederland
Plant Breeding
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2015
Keyword(s) aleyrodes-proletella homoptera - glucosinolate polymorphism - insect-resistance - cultivars - populations - fruticulosa - tomato - tabaci
Abstract The cabbage whitefly (Aleyrodes proletella) is a phloem-feeding insect that is a serious problem in Brassica oleracea crops like Brussels sprouts, kale and savoy cabbage. In order to develop whitefly-resistant varieties it is essential to identify effective sources of resistance. In this study, we screened a large collection of 432 accessions, including wild material and landraces of Brassica oleracea as well as crop wild relatives, to determine whitefly performance in a no-choice field experiment. Putatively resistant accessions were further tested under greenhouse conditions. Resistant accessions were identified among B. oleracea var. capitata (cabbage) landraces and in the species B. villosa, B. incana and B. montana. Whereas resistance in cabbage is only expressed in plants of at least 12 weeks old, some wild relatives were already starting to express resistance at 6 weeks. This could open up possibilities for breeding cabbages that are resistant at a young(er) plant age. Our research also shows again the importance of crop wild relatives for finding pest resistances.
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