Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 485983
Title Rain events decrease boreal peatland net CO2 uptake through reduced light availability
Author(s) Nijp, J.J.; Limpens, J.; Metselaar, K.; Peichl, M.; Nilsson, M.; Zee, S.E.A.T.M. van der; Berendse, F.
Source Global Change Biology 21 (2015)6. - ISSN 1354-1013 - p. 2309 - 2320.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.12864
Department(s) Plant Ecology and Nature Conservation
Soil Physics and Land Management
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2015
Keyword(s) carbon-dioxide - soil respiration - sphagnum mosses - water-content - solar-radiation - climate-change - precipitation - accumulation - drought - balance
Abstract Boreal peatlands store large amounts of carbon, reflecting their important role in the global carbon cycle. The short-term exchange and the long-term storage of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in these ecosystems are closely associated with the permanently wet surface conditions and are susceptible to drought. Especially, the single most important peat forming plant genus, Sphagnum, depends heavily on surface wetness for its primary production. Changes in rainfall patterns are expected to affect surface wetness, but how this transient rewetting affects net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) remains unknown. This study explores how the timing and characteristics of rain events during photosynthetic active periods, that is daytime, affect peatland NEE and whether rain event associated changes in environmental conditions modify this response (e.g. water table, radiation, vapour pressure deficit, temperature).
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