Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 488538
Title Manipulating and quantifying temperature-triggered coalescence with microcentrifugation
Author(s) Feng Huanhuan, Huanhuan; Ershov, D.S.; Krebs, T.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Gucht, J. van der; Sprakel, J.H.B.
Source Lab on a Chip 15 (2015)1. - ISSN 1473-0197 - p. 188 - 194.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1039/C4LC00773E
Department(s) Physical Chemistry and Soft Matter
Physical Chemistry and Colloid Science
Food Process Engineering
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2015
Keyword(s) disjoining pressure - droplet formation - emulsions
Abstract In this paper we describe a new approach to quantify the stability and coalescence kinetics of thermally switchable emulsions using an imaging-based microcentrifugation method. We first show that combining synchronized high-speed imaging with microfluidic centrifugation allows the direct measurement of the thermodynamic stability of emulsions, as expressed by the critical disjoining pressure. We apply this to a thermoresponsive emulsion, allowing us to measure the critical disjoining pressure as a function of temperature. The same method, combined with quantitative image analysis, also gives access to droplet-scale details of the coalescence process. We illustrate this by measuring temperature-dependent coalescence rates and by analysing the temperature-induced switching between two distinct microscopic mechanisms by which dense emulsions can destabilise to form a homogeneous oil phase.
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