Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 491285
Title Understanding plant immunity as a surveillance system to detect invasion
Author(s) Cook III, D.E.; Mesarich, C.H.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.
Source Annual Review of Phytopathology 53 (2015). - ISSN 0066-4286 - p. 541 - 563.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-080614-120114
Department(s) Laboratory of Phytopathology
EPS-2
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2015
Keyword(s) disease-resistance gene - bacterial elicitor flagellin - syringae effectors avrb - host-selective toxins - innate immunity - arabidopsis-thaliana - molecular-patterns - microbe interactions - durable resistance - necrotrophic pathogens
Abstract Various conceptual models to describe the plant immune system have been presented. The most recent paradigm to gain wide acceptance in the field is often referred to as the zigzag model, which reconciles the previously formulated gene-for-gene hypothesis with the recognition of general elicitors in a single model. This review focuses on the limitations of the current paradigm of molecular plant-microbe interactions and how it too narrowly defines the plant immune system. As such, we discuss an alternative view of plant innate immunity as a system that evolves to detect invasion. This view accommodates the range from mutualistic to parasitic symbioses that plants form with diverse organisms, as well as the spectrum of ligands that the plant immune system perceives. Finally, how this view can contribute to the current practice of resistance breeding is discussed.
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