Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 493715
Title Intestinal Microbiota And Diet in IBS: Causes, Consequences, or Epiphenomena?
Author(s) Rajilic-Stojanovic, M.; Jonkers, D.M.; Salonen, A.; Hanevik, K.; Raes, J.; Jalanka, J.; Vos, W.M. de; Manichanh, C.; Golic, N.; Enck, P.; Philippou, E.; Iraqi, F.A.; Clarke, G.; Spiller, R.C.; Penders, J.
Source American Journal of Gastroenterology 110 (2015)2. - ISSN 0002-9270 - p. 278 - 287.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2014.427
Department(s) VLAG
Microbiology
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2015
Abstract Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a heterogeneous functional disorder with a multifactorial etiology that involves the interplay of both host and environmental factors. Among environmental factors relevant for IBS etiology, the diet stands out given that the majority of IBS patients report their symptoms to be triggered by meals or specific foods. The diet provides substrates for microbial fermentation, and, as the composition of the intestinal microbiota is disturbed in IBS patients, the link between diet, microbiota composition, and microbial fermentation products might have an essential role in IBS etiology. In this review, we summarize current evidence regarding the impact of diet and the intestinal microbiota on IBS symptoms, as well as the reported interactions between diet and the microbiota composition. On the basis of the existing data, we suggest pathways (mechanisms) by which diet components, via the microbial fermentation, could trigger IBS symptoms. Finally, this review provides recommendations for future studies that would enable elucidation of the role of diet and microbiota and how these factors may be (inter)related in the pathophysiology of IBS
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