Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

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Record number 515746
Title Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli O157 in beef at butcher shops and restaurants in central Ethiopia
Author(s) Beyi, Ashenafi Feyisa; Fite, Akafete Teklu; Tora, Ephrem; Tafese, Asdesach; Genu, Tadele; Kaba, Tamirat; Beyene, Tariku J.; Beyene, Takele; Korsa, Mesula Geloye; Tadesse, Fanos; Zutter, Lieven De; Goddeeris, Bruno M.; Cox, Eric
Source BMC Microbiology 17 (2017)1. - ISSN 1471-2180
DOI https://doi.org/10.1186/s12866-017-0964-z
Department(s) Business Economics
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2017
Keyword(s) Antimicrobial susceptibility - Beef - Butcher shops - Escherichia coli O157 - Minced beef - Restaurants
Abstract

Background: Ethiopia bears the largest burden of foodborne diseases in Africa, and diarrheal diseases are the second leading causes of premature deaths. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157 causes an asymptomatic infection to severe diarrhea and/or hemolytic-uremic syndrome in humans. Methods: A total of 440 beef carcass and in-contact surface swabs from 55 butcher shops and 85 minced beef samples from 40 restaurants in central Ethiopia were collected and examined for the presence of E. coli O157. Standard microbiological methods were used to isolate and identify E. coli O157 and to characterize the antimicrobial resistance of the isolates. Results: E. coli O157 was detected in 4.5% carcass swabs (n = 5) and 3.6% cutting board swabs (n = 4) samples from butcher shops. E. coli O157 was not detected in any of the minced beef samples obtained from restaurants. All isolates (n = 9) were 100% susceptible to five drugs, but five isolates were resistant to amoxicillin, two isolates to streptomycin and three isolates to chloramphenicol. One isolate was resistant to two drugs and another to three drugs. Conclusions: The present study shows a low prevalence of E. coli O157 in beef sold at butcher shops. Nevertheless, given the low infective dose of this pathogen and the deep-rooted tradition of consuming raw or undercooked beef, the current prevalence should not be considered lightly from a public health perspective.

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