Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 527355
Title When does it pay off to prime for defense? A modeling analysis
Author(s) Douma, Jacob C.; Vermeulen, Peter J.; Poelman, Erik H.; Dicke, Marcel; Anten, Niels P.R.
Source New Phytologist 216 (2017)3. - ISSN 0028-646X - p. 782 - 797.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.14771
Department(s) Crop and Weed Ecology
PE&RC
Centre for Crop Systems Analysis
Laboratory of Entomology
EPS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2017
Keyword(s) Community - Fitness - Insect herbivory - Plant competition - Priming - Volatiles
Abstract Plants can prepare for future herbivore attack through a process called priming. Primed plants respond more strongly and/or faster to insect attack succeeding the priming event than nonprimed plants, while the energetic costs of priming are relatively low. To better understand the evolution of priming, we developed a simulation model, partly parameterized for Brassica nigra plants, to explore how the fitness benefits of priming change when plants are grown in different biotic environments. Model simulations showed that herbivore dynamics (arrival probability, arrival time, and feeding rate) affect the optimal duration, the optimal investment and the fitness benefits of priming. Competition for light increases the indirect costs of priming, but may also result in a larger payoff when the nonprimed plant experiences substantial leaf losses. This modeling approach identified some important knowledge gaps: herbivore arrival rates on individual plants are rarely reported but they shape the optimal duration of priming, and it would pay off if the likelihood, severity and timing of the attack could be discerned from the priming cue, but it is unknown if plants can do so. In addition, the model generated some testable predictions, for example that the sensitivity to the priming cue decreases with plant age.
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