Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 544287
Title Modeling water quality in the Anthropocene: directions for the next-generation aquatic ecosystem models
Author(s) Mooij, W.M.; Wijk, Dianneke van; Beusen, A.H.W.; Brederveld, R.J.; Chang, M.; Cobben, Marleen M.P.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Downing, A.S.; Janssen, A.B.G.; Hengeveld, G.M.
Source Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 36 (2019). - ISSN 1877-3435 - p. 85 - 95.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cosust.2018.10.012
Department(s) PE&RC
WIMEK
Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management
Water Systems and Global Change
Biometris
Forest and Nature Conservation Policy
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Abstract Everything changes and nothing stands still” (Heraclitus). Here we review three major improvements to freshwater aquatic ecosystem models — and ecological models in general — as water quality scenario analysis tools towards a sustainable future. To tackle the rapid and deeply connected dynamics characteristic of the Anthropocene, we argue for the inclusion of eco-evolutionary, novel ecosystem and social-ecological dynamics. These dynamics arise from adaptive responses in organisms and ecosystems to global environmental change and act at different integration levels and different time scales. We provide reasons and means to incorporate each improvement into aquatic ecosystem models. Throughout this study we refer to Lake Victoria as a microcosm of the evolving novel social-ecological systems of the Anthropocene. The Lake Victoria case clearly shows how interlinked eco-evolutionary, novel ecosystem and social-ecological dynamics are, and demonstrates the need for transdisciplinary research approaches towards global sustainability.
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