Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 544336
Title In vitro and in vivo Effects of Lactate on Metabolism and Cytokine Production of Human Primary PBMCs and Monocytes
Author(s) Ratter, Jacqueline M.; Rooijackers, Hanne M.M.; Hooiveld, Guido J.; Hijmans, Anneke G.M.; Galan, Bastiaan E. de; Tack, Cees J.; Stienstra, Rinke
Source Frontiers in Immunology 9 (2018). - ISSN 1664-3224
DOI https://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2018.02564
Department(s) Nutrition, Metabolism and Genomics
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) cytokines - glycolysis - immunometabolism - innate immune cells - lactate - monocytes
Abstract

Lactate, the end product of anaerobic glycolysis, is produced in high amounts by innate immune cells during inflammatory activation. Although immunomodulating effects of lactate have been reported, evidence from human studies is scarce. Here we show that expression of genes involved in lactate metabolism and transport is modulated in human immune cells during infection and upon inflammatory activation with TLR ligands in vitro, indicating an important role for lactate metabolism in inflammation. Extracellular lactate induces metabolic reprogramming in innate immune cells, as evidenced by reduced glycolytic and increased oxidative rates of monocytes immediately after exposure to lactate. A short-term infusion of lactate in humans in vivo increased ex vivo glucose consumption of PBMCs, but effects on metabolic rates and cytokine production were limited. Interestingly, long-term treatment with lactate ex vivo, reflecting pathophysiological conditions in local microenvironments such as tumor or adipose tissue, significantly modulated cytokine production with predominantly anti-inflammatory effects. We found time- and stimuli-dependent effects of extracellular lactate on cytokine production, further emphasizing the complex interplay between metabolism and immune cell function. Together, our findings reveal lactate as a modulator of immune cell metabolism which translates to reduced inflammation and may ultimately function as a negative feedback signal to prevent excessive inflammatory responses.

Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.