Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 545559
Title A recipe for success? Learning from the rapid adoption of improved chickpea varieties in Ethiopia
Author(s) Verkaart, Simone; Mausch, Kai; Claessens, Lieven; Giller, Ken E.
Source International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability 17 (2018)1. - ISSN 1473-5903 - p. 34 - 48.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/14735903.2018.1559007
Department(s) Development Economics
PE&RC
Soil Geography and Landscape
Plant Production Systems
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) Ethiopia - fixed effects - improved chickpea - panel data - Successful adoption
Abstract

Many studies detail constraints deemed responsible for the limited adoption of new technologies among smallholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa. By contrast, here we study the conditions that led to the remarkably fast spread of improved chickpea varieties in Ethiopia. Within just seven years, the adoption rate rose from 30 to 80% of the farmers. A combination of factors explains the rapid uptake. Their attraction lay in superior returns and disease resistance. Chickpea was already an important crop for rural households in the studied districts, for both cash income and consumption. Good market access and an easy accessibility of extension services advanced the adoption process. Thus, an attractive technology suitable for rural households in a conducive environment enabled adoption. Our findings prompt us to stress the importance of tailoring agricultural innovations to the realities and demands of rural households, and the need to design and deploy interventions on the basis of ex-ante knowledge on factors potentially determining their success or failure.

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