Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 545612
Title Optimizing ex situ genetic resource collections for European livestock conservation
Author(s) Oliveira Silva, Rafael De; Ahmadi, Bouda Vosough; Hiemstra, Sipke Joost; Moran, Dominic
Source Journal of Animal Breeding and Genetics 136 (2019)1. - ISSN 0931-2668 - p. 63 - 73.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/jbg.12368
Department(s) Animal Breeding & Genomics
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Keyword(s) cryoconservation - ex situ conservation - gene bank - livestock diversity - optimization
Abstract

Ex situ collections offer the potential to reduce extinction risks, affording option to society in maintaining future breeding opportunities for productivity and heritage traits. However, how much should we be seeking to collect and conserve in gene banks, and where? We developed a mathematical model to optimize logistical decisions of breed conservation choices and to evaluate alternative scenarios for efficiently re-allocating genetic materials currently stored in different European gene banks, allowing for cross-country collections, cost and cryogenic capacity differentials. We show how alternative allocations for the breeds that are currently stored in 11 European gene banks could reduce overall conservation costs by around 20% by selecting cryogenic banks that have relatively lower combination of fixed and collection costs, and are geographically closer to collection regions. Our results show that centralizing collections in one gene bank would double the costs, relative to collective European collections approaches. We also calculate marginal costs of collections and show that increasing diversity within the gene banks implies in higher costs per conserved breed.

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