Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 546612
Title Changes in Plasma Protein Expression Indicative of Early Diet-induced Metabolic Disease in Male Pigs (Sus scrofa).
Author(s) Pas, M.F.W. te; Koopmans, Sietse Jan; Kruijt, L.; Boeren, J.A.; Smits, M.A.
Source Comparative Medicine 68 (2018)4. - ISSN 1532-0820 - p. 286 - 293.
DOI https://doi.org/10.30802/AALAS-CM-17-000099
Department(s) WIAS
Animal Breeding & Genomics
Animal Nutrition
Biochemistry
Infection Biology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Abstract Recognition of the preclinical stages of metabolic diseases such as diabetes helps to prevent full development of the disease. In our research, we alter the diet composition of pigs to create a model of human metabolic disease. The objective of the current study was to identify plasma proteins and biologic mechanisms that differed in expression between pigs fed a 'cafeteria diet' (considered unhealthy; high in saturated fats) and those fed a 'Mediterranean diet' (considered healthy; high in unsaturated fats). Pigs fed the cafeteria diet showed increased plasma levels of proteins related to LDL ('bad cholesterol'), immune processes, blood clotting, and metal binding. The Mediterranean diet was associated with increased plasma quantities of proteins associated HDL particles ('good cholesterol'), binding of LDL particles, regulation of immune processes, and glycolysis. Pigs fed a cafeteria diet showed molecular signs of diabetes and atherosclerosis-even in the absence of clinical symptoms-which seemed to protect against the development of metabolic disorders. The current results suggest potential biomarkers of the early onset of metabolic syndromes. These biomarkers can help to reveal specific metabolic changes that precede the onset of diabetes, thus enabling the initiation of patient-specific interventions early during pathophysiologic development.
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