Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 547353
Title Whither the forest transition? Climate change, policy responses, and redistributed forests in the twenty-first century
Author(s) Rudel, Thomas K.; Meyfroidt, Patrick; Chazdon, Robin; Bongers, Frans; Sloan, Sean; Grau, H.R.; Holt, Tracy Van; Schneider, Laura
Source Ambio (2019). - ISSN 0044-7447
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s13280-018-01143-0
Department(s) PE&RC
Forest Ecology and Forest Management
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Keyword(s) Forest gains - Forest transitions - Latecomer effects - Tree plantations
Abstract

Forest transitions occur when net reforestation replaces net deforestation in places. Because forest transitions can increase biodiversity and augment carbon sequestration, they appeal to policymakers contending with the degrading effects of forest loss and climate change. What then can policymakers do to trigger forest transitions? The historical record over the last two centuries provides insights into the precipitating conditions. The early transitions often occurred passively, through the spontaneous regeneration of trees on abandoned agricultural lands. Later forest transitions occurred more frequently after large-scale crisis narratives emerged and spurred governments to take action, often by planting trees on degraded, sloped lands. To a greater degree than their predecessors, latecomer forest transitions exhibit centralized loci of power, leaders with clearly articulated goals, and rapid changes in forest cover. These historical shifts in forest transitions reflect our growing appreciation of their utility for countering droughts, floods, land degradation, and climate change.

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