Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 547978
Title Insights into the sediment toxicity of personal care products to freshwater oligochaete worms using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy
Author(s) Peng, Feng Jiao; Hu, Li Xin; Pan, Chang Gui; Ying, Guang Guo; Brink, Paul J. van den
Source Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety 172 (2019). - ISSN 0147-6513 - p. 296 - 302.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoenv.2019.01.098
Department(s) Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management
WIMEK
Environmental Risk Assessment
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Keyword(s) Biochemical fingerprint - Deposit-feeder - FTIR spectroscopy - Microcosm - Musk - Triclosan
Abstract

Personal care products (PCPs) are ubiquitous in the environment due to their wide use in daily life. However, there are insufficient sediment toxicity data of PCPs under ecologically relevant conditions. Here we used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to investigate the sediment toxicity of triclosan (TCS) and galaxolide (HHCB) to two freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates, Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri and Branchiura sowerbyi, in microcosms containing a diverse biological community. Exposure to 8 µg TCS/g and 100 µg HHCB/g dry weight (dw) sediment induced significant biochemical alterations in the L. hoffmeisteri tissue. 8 µg TCS/g primarily affected proteins and nucleic acid while 100 µg HHCB/g mainly affected proteins and lipids of L. hoffmeisteri. However, 0.8 µg TCS/g and 30 µg HHCB/g did not cause significant subcellular toxicity to L. hoffmeisteri. In contrast, exposure of B. sowerbyi to 30 µg HHCB/g led to significant biochemical changes, including proteins, polysaccharides and lipids. Therefore, B. sowerbyi was more sensitive to sediment-associated HHCB than L. hoffmeisteri. Such effects were significantly enhanced when the HHCB concentration increased to 100 µg/g dw where death of B. sowerbyi occurred. These results demonstrate the application of FTIR spectroscopy to sediment toxicity testing of chemicals to benthic invertebrates with biochemical alterations as endpoints that are more sensitive than standard toxic endpoints (e.g., survival and growth).

Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.