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Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 547997
Title Gender Segregation and Income Differences in Nicaragua
Author(s) Herrera, Carlos; Dijkstra, Geske; Ruben, Ruerd
Source Feminist Economics 25 (2019)3. - ISSN 1354-5701 - p. 144 - 170.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/13545701.2019.1567931
Department(s) Programmamanagement
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Keyword(s) gender inequality - income - Labor market segregation - Nicaragua
Abstract

Despite having higher average education levels, Nicaraguan women still earn much less than men. Furthermore, the country has one of the highest levels of occupational gender segregation in Latin America. This paper aims to explain the gender income gap in Nicaragua, taking into account individual characteristics, engagement in specific occupations and sectors, and geographical location. Using a multilevel framework, the study finds that while a considerable part of the income gap can be explained by women’s employment in occupations and sectors with low remuneration, another substantial part of this gap is attributable to the prevalence of patriarchal gender norms–and thus cannot be explained by human capital factors. These results show that understanding labor market segregation is vital for comprehending the perseverance of the gender income gap, and they further imply that women’s progress in breaching the gender stereotypes in Nicaragua is still limited.

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