Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 548189
Title Co-current crossflow microfiltration in a microchannel
Author(s) Amar, Levy I.; Hill, Michael I.; Faria, Monica; Guisado, Daniela; Rijn, Cees J.M. van; Leonard, Edward F.
Source Biomedical Microdevices 21 (2019)1. - ISSN 1387-2176 - 1 p.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s10544-019-0362-4
Department(s) VLAG
Organic Chemistry
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Keyword(s) Blood - Constant transmembrane pressure - Cross-flow - Erythrocytes - Microfiltration model - Microfluidics - Microsieve - Nanopores - Plasma - Sieve
Abstract

Steady state crossflow microfiltration (CMF) is an important and often necessary means of particle separation and concentration for both industrial and biomedical processes. The factors controlling the performance of CMF have been extensively reviewed. A major factor is transmembrane pressure (TMP). Because microchannels have small height, they tend to have high pressure gradients in the feed-flow direction. In the extreme, these gradients may even reverse the pressure across the membrane (inciting backflow). It is therefore desirable to compensate for the effect of feed-flow on the TMP, aiming at constant transmembrane pressure (cTMP) at a value which maximizes filtrate flux. This is especially critical during filtration of deformable particles (e.g. erythrocytes) through low intrinsic resistance membranes. Filtration flux is generally taken to be directly proportional to TMP, with pressure drop along the channel decreasing in the flow direction. A co-current flow of filtrate in a suitably designed filtrate collecting channel is shown to allow the TMP to remain constant and permit the sieving surface to perform optimally, permitting up to twice as much filtration over that of a naïve configuration. Manipulation of the filtrate channel may be even more beneficial if it prevents backflow that might otherwise occur at the end of a sufficiently long channel. Experiments with erythrocyte suspensions, reported here, validate these concepts.

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